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Wednesday, March 22, 2006

Busted

I've been busted by a number of people now as to my 'true identity', so am toying with the idea of 'coming out'.

Which raises some interesting questions about how to disclose my business interests when commenting on this blog. After all, isn't the reason that I'm blogging about this crap in the first place purely because I'm part of the PR industry?

And isn't the process of building up a decent head of steam with this blogging lark and then exposing my true identity just a cynical way for me to forward my employers' image in a market that's particularly focused on blogs and how they work? Surely then this blog should have a blanket disclosure clause that warns every visitor of my intentions?

But what if that isn't the case?

What if I do care about the fine line between traditional and social publishing and sometimes that natural interest sometimes crosses with what I do to earn a living? How do I disclose that inevitable, but less regular, occurrence?

I'm not sure I like the way Morgan and Loic and most other people do it - following the post itself. Yes, the method is up front and fair, but I always feel a little cheated that I've absorbed the info as gospel, only to find out after it had a motive all along.

But, as is usual with this blogging business, I end up at the same question every time: "Does anyone really care?" With so little to regulate the blogosphere and the errant knaves within, most of the comments are purely opinion anyway, with little control over the content.

Why shouldn't that opinion be tainted with a little commercial bias?

My head hurts. I feel a new entry into the clogger Code of Ethics coming on... I know, I know. It's been a while.

Here goes:

3. Disclose everything. (Godin)

I've named it after Seth Godin as he's the top hit in Google for 'blog disclosure', and his post made me smile. Oh, and it's ages old - well before anyone else started talking about this stuff.

And so, the usual recap:

1. In social situations, everything is off the record unless otherwise agreed. (Foremski)

2. When you edit a published blog post, track your changes openly and publicly. (Tebbutt)

3. Disclose everything. (Godin)

Onwards and downwards...

Tagged:

5 Comments:

Anonymous Stephen Davies said...

"I've been busted by a number of people now as to my 'true identity', so am toying with the idea of 'coming out'."

Do it!

"After all, isn't the reason that I'm blogging about this crap in the first place purely because I'm part of the PR industry?"

I wouldn't think that. In fact I thought you were a journalist. I don't think there's anything wrong with disclosing who you work for.

"And isn't the process of building up a decent head of steam with this blogging lark and then exposing my true identity just a cynical way for me to forward my employers' image in a market that's particularly focused on blogs and how they work?"

Not in my opinion. It's fun too. You are/were playing it cautious in the PR blogosphere. Nothing wrong with that IMHO. In fact, I'm sure there's a PR lesson in it for everyone.

"What if I do care about the fine line between traditional and social publishing and sometimes that natural interest sometimes crosses with what I do to earn a living?"

Hey, you must enjoy your job then?

"I'm not sure I like the way Morgan and Loic and most other people do it - following the post itself."

I can't see anything wrong with it, but that's your opinion and you can still do your own thing the way you want to.

"But, as is usual with this blogging business, I end up at the same question every time: 'Does anyone really care?'"

Intrigued.

"Why shouldn't that opinion be tainted with a little commercial bias?"

Not sure how to answer that one. We're all still learning this stuff.

Stephen

11:15 pm  
Blogger PR Monkey said...

Who cares who you are if you're writing interesting stuff?

And if people reading blogs are naive enough to think that bloggers don't have an agenda - declared or otherwise - then they should stop believing everything they read in the news as well.

And yes, Santa Claus doesn't exist.

9:42 am  
Blogger Xulujerk said...

how ridiculous. you're "listed" all over the place for what the most part looks likes a self-serving blog. surprise, your secret james bond identity might be revealed. shall i call the NY Times?

9:51 am  
Blogger Jon said...

Stephen - thanks for your comments.

I am a journalist. I just happen to be working for a PR agency.

9:31 pm  
Anonymous Stephen said...

Aaaah Haaah!

I didn't have a clue!

The plot thickens. :-)

S:-D

P.S. Like the new design BTW.

10:59 am  

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